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Someone get me another computer, stat!

Someone get me another computer, stat!

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

#nofilter Just the best damn sushi ever. Yes, it’s wrapped in tuna and then salmon. And topped with jalapeño.  (at Samurai Sushi & Roll)

#nofilter Just the best damn sushi ever. Yes, it’s wrapped in tuna and then salmon. And topped with jalapeño. (at Samurai Sushi & Roll)

Good acro class yesterday! (at Pa-Kua)

Good acro class yesterday! (at Pa-Kua)

Ooh, pretty!

Ooh, pretty!

Minor iOS 7 Annoyance #12, SOLVED!

The new Messages app has a bunch of advantages over the earlier versions (easier forwarding and deletion of messages, time stamps), but the name display was driving me nuts. Just showing the first name for a contact is really not sufficient to identify someone, at least, not for me. I kept going to the Messages settings to look for a fix, and wasn’t able to find anything.

Turns out, I was looking in the wrong place. If you go to Settings, then Mail, Contacts, Calendars, and scroll down to the Contacts section, there’s a Short Name field. Clicking into that allows you to toggle the use of short names, and also allows you to choose the default shortening methodology. This is also where you can select whether to prefer nicknames (I’m not sure if that was an option in iOS 6, but I like that the field is actually useful in iOS 7).

Now, if only I could find a setting to allow more than 3x3 icons in folders…

I know it’s over.

thischarmingcharlie:

The Smiths licensing company (Universal Music Publishing Group) has started requesting posts be removed from This Charming Charlie. So far 6 posts have been removed, and it is increasing every hour. If you like the page, please save copies of the comics to your own computer. I will repost the images on my personal site.

 

It was fun while it lasted, I wish Morrissey and Marr were a bit more understanding.

How is this not Fair Use? It seems like it’s almost the very definition, utilizing two distinct forms of art from different media and creating a new one with different meaning and message.

The new Kindle lineup
The gadget world is abuzz with commentary today about the new Kindle lineup, especially the new Fire. At $200, it’s an intriguing entry into the tablet world, and it could definitely create a new product space. Except for one little thing — in my experience, the biggest drawback to the iPad is the resolution. The fonts look slightly jagged for reading, and video is not quite sharp, because of the so-so pixel density. The new Kindles have the same pixel set in a 7” form factor, which probably is not enough to make fonts look smooth and video look sharp. (More about my opinion of the 7” form factor another time, but I’ll say it’s not to my taste.)

The pixel density issue makes a big enough difference to me that I tend to read on my iPhone much more than I do on my iPad, despite the fact that I’m a speed reader and the larger screen theoretically means I could read more per page on the iPad. It’s a shame, if the new Kindle line had close to Retina density, I’d be putting a preorder in now.